Scanning probe microscopy and related methods

  1. editorImage
  1. Editor: Prof. Ernst Meyer
    Universität Basel

Since the invention of scanning tunnelling microscopy and atomic force microscopy a new class of local probe microscopes has entered the laboratories around the world. Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) uses probing tips to map properties, such as topography, local adhesive forces, elasticity, friction or magnetic properties. In the emerging fields of nanoscience and nanotechnology these types of microscopes help to characterize the nanoworld. In addition, local probes can also be used to modify the surfaces and to perform lithography processes. An important aspect of SPM is the possibility to modify surfaces. The probing tip can be either used to push or pull atoms, molecules or particles across surfaces. These experiments give information about the local bonding and to explore friction and wear mechanisms.

  • Editorial
  • Published 22 Dec 2010

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Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2010, 1, 155–157, doi:10.3762/bjnano.1.18

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  • Published 22 Dec 2010

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Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2010, 1, 158–162, doi:10.3762/bjnano.1.19

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  • Published 22 Dec 2010

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Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2010, 1, 163–171, doi:10.3762/bjnano.1.20

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  • Published 22 Dec 2010

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Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2010, 1, 172–181, doi:10.3762/bjnano.1.21

Defects in oxide surfaces studied by atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopy

  1. Thomas König,
  2. Georg H. Simon,
  3. Lars Heinke,
  4. Leonid Lichtenstein and
  5. Markus Heyde
  • Review
  • Published 03 Jan 2011

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Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2011, 2, 1–14, doi:10.3762/bjnano.2.1

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  • Published 06 Jan 2011

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Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2011, 2, 15–27, doi:10.3762/bjnano.2.2

Oriented growth of porphyrin-based molecular wires on ionic crystals analysed by nc-AFM

  1. Thilo Glatzel,
  2. Lars Zimmerli,
  3. Shigeki Kawai,
  4. Ernst Meyer,
  5. Leslie-Anne Fendt and
  6. Francois Diederich
  • Full Research Paper
  • Published 13 Jan 2011

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  • Video

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2011, 2, 34–39, doi:10.3762/bjnano.2.4

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  • Published 27 Jan 2011

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Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2011, 2, 59–65, doi:10.3762/bjnano.2.8

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  • Published 04 Feb 2011

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Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2011, 2, 85–98, doi:10.3762/bjnano.2.10

The role of the cantilever in Kelvin probe force microscopy measurements

  1. George Elias,
  2. Thilo Glatzel,
  3. Ernst Meyer,
  4. Alex Schwarzman,
  5. Amir Boag and
  6. Yossi Rosenwaks
  • Full Research Paper
  • Published 18 May 2011

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Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2011, 2, 252–260, doi:10.3762/bjnano.2.29

Distinguishing magnetic and electrostatic interactions by a Kelvin probe force microscopy–magnetic force microscopy combination

  1. Miriam Jaafar,
  2. Oscar Iglesias-Freire,
  3. Luis Serrano-Ramón,
  4. Manuel Ricardo Ibarra,
  5. Jose Maria de Teresa and
  6. Agustina Asenjo
  • Full Research Paper
  • Published 07 Sep 2011

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  • Supp. Info

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2011, 2, 552–560, doi:10.3762/bjnano.2.59

The atomic force microscope as a mechano–electrochemical pen

  1. Christian Obermair,
  2. Andreas Wagner and
  3. Thomas Schimmel
  • Full Research Paper
  • Published 04 Oct 2011

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Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2011, 2, 659–664, doi:10.3762/bjnano.2.70

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