Biological and bioinspired adhesion and friction

  1. editorImage
  1. Editors: Prof. Stanislav N. Gorb, Christians-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel
    and Prof. Kerstin Koch, Hochschule Rhein-Waal

Physical phenomena such as adhesion and friction are widelyspread in biological systems. They rely on a combination of various mechanisms. Since living creatures move on land, in air and in water, there are numerous mechanical interactions between their body surfaces and the environment. Moreover, the motion of cells and tissues inside their bodies is an important part of developmental processes, circulation, respiration, excretion, and any other kind of motility. All these processes rely on adhesion and friction and are continuously under evolutionary pressure, which has contributed to the appearance of highly-specialized surfaces adapted to the enhancement, reduction, or optimization of their frictional and adhesive behavior. The study of these adaptations may also provide inspirations for the design of biologically-inspired artificial surfaces. This Thematic Series is a collection of experimental and theoretical studies which range from insect adhesion, bacterial adhesion and skin friction to artificial biomimetic systems, e.g., snake-skin inspired polymer patterns or gecko tape.

See also the Thematic Series:
Biological and biomimetic materials and surfaces
Biomimetic materials

  • Editorial
  • Published 03 Sep 2014

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 1450–1451, doi:10.3762/bjnano.5.157

Friction behavior of a microstructured polymer surface inspired by snake skin

  1. Martina J. Baum,
  2. Lars Heepe and
  3. Stanislav N. Gorb
  • Full Research Paper
  • Published 24 Jan 2014

  • PDF

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 83–97, doi:10.3762/bjnano.5.8

Hairy suckers: the surface microstructure and its possible functional significance in the Octopus vulgaris sucker

  1. Francesca Tramacere,
  2. Esther Appel,
  3. Barbara Mazzolai and
  4. Stanislav N. Gorb
  • Letter
  • Published 02 May 2014

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Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 561–565, doi:10.3762/bjnano.5.66

  • Full Research Paper
  • Published 13 May 2014

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Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 622–629, doi:10.3762/bjnano.5.73

  • Full Research Paper
  • Published 14 May 2014

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  • Supp. Info

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 630–638, doi:10.3762/bjnano.5.74

  • Full Research Paper
  • Published 12 Jun 2014

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  • Supp. Info

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 837–845, doi:10.3762/bjnano.5.95

  • Full Research Paper
  • Published 23 Jun 2014

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  • Supp. Info

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 887–894, doi:10.3762/bjnano.5.101

  • Full Research Paper
  • Published 25 Jun 2014

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Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 903–909, doi:10.3762/bjnano.5.103

Molecular biology approaches in bioadhesion research

  1. Marcelo Rodrigues,
  2. Birgit Lengerer,
  3. Thomas Ostermann and
  4. Peter Ladurner
  • Review
  • Published 08 Jul 2014

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Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 983–993, doi:10.3762/bjnano.5.112

Insect attachment on crystalline bioinspired wax surfaces formed by alkanes of varying chain lengths

  1. Elena Gorb,
  2. Sandro Böhm,
  3. Nadine Jacky,
  4. Louis-Philippe Maier,
  5. Kirstin Dening,
  6. Sasha Pechook,
  7. Boaz Pokroy and
  8. Stanislav Gorb
  • Full Research Paper
  • Published 14 Jul 2014

  • PDF

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 1031–1041, doi:10.3762/bjnano.5.116

Dry friction of microstructured polymer surfaces inspired by snake skin

  1. Martina J. Baum,
  2. Lars Heepe,
  3. Elena Fadeeva and
  4. Stanislav N. Gorb
  • Full Research Paper
  • Published 21 Jul 2014

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Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 1091–1103, doi:10.3762/bjnano.5.122

  • Review
  • Published 28 Jul 2014

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  • Video

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 1160–1166, doi:10.3762/bjnano.5.127

Model systems for studying cell adhesion and biomimetic actin networks

  1. Dorothea Brüggemann,
  2. Johannes P. Frohnmayer and
  3. Joachim P. Spatz
  • Review
  • Published 01 Aug 2014

  • PDF

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 1193–1202, doi:10.3762/bjnano.5.131

Surface topography and contact mechanics of dry and wet human skin

  1. Alexander E. Kovalev,
  2. Kirstin Dening,
  3. Bo N. J. Persson and
  4. Stanislav N. Gorb
  • Full Research Paper
  • Published 22 Aug 2014

  • PDF

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 1341–1348, doi:10.3762/bjnano.5.147

Influence of the PDMS substrate stiffness on the adhesion of Acanthamoeba castellanii

  1. Sören B. Gutekunst,
  2. Carsten Grabosch,
  3. Alexander Kovalev,
  4. Stanislav N. Gorb and
  5. Christine Selhuber-Unkel
  • Full Research Paper
  • Published 28 Aug 2014

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Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 1393–1398, doi:10.3762/bjnano.5.152

Hydrophobic interaction governs unspecific adhesion of staphylococci: a single cell force spectroscopy study

  1. Nicolas Thewes,
  2. Peter Loskill,
  3. Philipp Jung,
  4. Henrik Peisker,
  5. Markus Bischoff,
  6. Mathias Herrmann and
  7. Karin Jacobs
  • Full Research Paper
  • Published 10 Sep 2014

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Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 1501–1512, doi:10.3762/bjnano.5.163

Equilibrium states and stability of pre-tensioned adhesive tapes

  1. Carmine Putignano,
  2. Luciano Afferrante,
  3. Luigi Mangialardi and
  4. Giuseppe Carbone
  • Full Research Paper
  • Published 07 Oct 2014

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Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 1725–1731, doi:10.3762/bjnano.5.182

  • Review
  • Published 17 Dec 2014

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Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 2424–2439, doi:10.3762/bjnano.5.252

The capillary adhesion technique: a versatile method for determining the liquid adhesion force and sample stiffness

  1. Daniel Gandyra,
  2. Stefan Walheim,
  3. Stanislav Gorb,
  4. Wilhelm Barthlott and
  5. Thomas Schimmel
  • Full Research Paper
  • Published 02 Jan 2015

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  • Video

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2015, 6, 11–18, doi:10.3762/bjnano.6.2

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