Materials for sustainable energy production, storage, and conversion

  1. editorImage
  1. Editor: Prof. Maximilian Fichtner
    Helmholtz Institute Ulm

A steadily growing human population and the growing global economy have led to a need to reduce CO2 emissions by using renewable energy sources such as solar, wind, biomass, geothermal, and water power with evergrowing interest in the fields of energy harvesting and storage seen during the past two decades. The harvesting of light is still a challenge, and solutions are needed to achieve both high efficiency and low cost electricity generation. While wind and sun are among the most powerful options for electricity generation in general, their intermittent nature makes large storage capacity necessary. Here, solutions are needed that are based either on chemical compounds, such as hydrogen or hydrocarbons, or on safe, low cost and powerful batteries, which have a long cycle and calendar life and a high energy density. For the reconversion of hydrogen or organic liquids efficient fuel cells are needed as converters. In addition to the harvesting and storage of electrical energy, the storage of heat is another essential element in the future energy landscape.

  • Editorial
  • Published 23 Jul 2015

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2015, 6, 1601–1602, doi:10.3762/bjnano.6.163

  • Review
  • Published 18 Aug 2014

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Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 1291–1311, doi:10.3762/bjnano.5.143

Liquid fuel cells

  1. Grigorii L. Soloveichik
  • Review
  • Published 29 Aug 2014

  • PDF

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 1399–1418, doi:10.3762/bjnano.5.153

  • Review
  • Published 07 Jan 2015

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Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2015, 6, 68–83, doi:10.3762/bjnano.6.8

  • Full Research Paper
  • Published 20 Apr 2015

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Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2015, 6, 987–1007, doi:10.3762/bjnano.6.102

From lithium to sodium: cell chemistry of room temperature sodium–air and sodium–sulfur batteries

  1. Philipp Adelhelm,
  2. Pascal Hartmann,
  3. Conrad L. Bender,
  4. Martin Busche,
  5. Christine Eufinger and
  6. Juergen Janek
  • Review
  • Published 23 Apr 2015

  • PDF

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2015, 6, 1016–1055, doi:10.3762/bjnano.6.105

Current–voltage characteristics of manganite–titanite perovskite junctions

  1. Benedikt Ifland,
  2. Patrick Peretzki,
  3. Birte Kressdorf,
  4. Philipp Saring,
  5. Andreas Kelling,
  6. Michael Seibt and
  7. Christian Jooss
  • Full Research Paper
  • Published 07 Jul 2015

  • PDF

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2015, 6, 1467–1484, doi:10.3762/bjnano.6.152

Thermal energy storage – overview and specific insight into nitrate salts for sensible and latent heat storage

  1. Nicole Pfleger,
  2. Thomas Bauer,
  3. Claudia Martin,
  4. Markus Eck and
  5. Antje Wörner
  • Review
  • Published 09 Jul 2015

  • PDF

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2015, 6, 1487–1497, doi:10.3762/bjnano.6.154

  • Review
  • Published 31 Aug 2015

  • PDF

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2015, 6, 1821–1839, doi:10.3762/bjnano.6.186

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