Biomimetic materials

  1. editorImage
  1. Editors: Prof. Wilhelm Barthlott, Universität Bonn,
    and Prof. Kerstin Koch, Hochschule Rhein-Waal

Bionics and biomimetics became important only after 1960, and it was only in the new millennium they became worldwide disciplines with high potentials for innovation. An apparently simple observation can lead to new materials, structures and design principles, but the technical transformation and realization may take a much longer time. Biomimetic materials provide innovative solutions for the design of a new generation of bio inspired functional materials.

See also the Thematic Series:
Biological and biomimetic materials and surfaces
Biological and bioinspired adhesion and friction

See videos about biomimetics at Beilstein TV.

Biomimetic materials

  1. Wilhelm Barthlott and
  2. Kerstin Koch
  • Editorial
  • Published 10 Mar 2011

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2011, 2, 135–136, doi:10.3762/bjnano.2.16

  • Review
  • Published 01 Feb 2011

  • PDF

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2011, 2, 66–84, doi:10.3762/bjnano.2.9

Superhydrophobic surfaces of the water bug Notonecta glauca: a model for friction reduction and air retention

  1. Petra Ditsche-Kuru,
  2. Erik S. Schneider,
  3. Jan-Erik Melskotte,
  4. Martin Brede,
  5. Alfred Leder and
  6. Wilhelm Barthlott
  • Full Research Paper
  • Published 10 Mar 2011

  • PDF

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2011, 2, 137–144, doi:10.3762/bjnano.2.17

Capillary origami: superhydrophobic ribbon surfaces and liquid marbles

  1. Glen McHale,
  2. Michael I. Newton,
  3. Neil J. Shirtcliffe and
  4. Nicasio R. Geraldi
  • Full Research Paper
  • Published 10 Mar 2011

  • PDF

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2011, 2, 145–151, doi:10.3762/bjnano.2.18

Superhydrophobicity in perfection: the outstanding properties of the lotus leaf

  1. Hans J. Ensikat,
  2. Petra Ditsche-Kuru,
  3. Christoph Neinhuis and
  4. Wilhelm Barthlott
  • Full Research Paper
  • Published 10 Mar 2011

  • PDF

  • Video

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2011, 2, 152–161, doi:10.3762/bjnano.2.19

  • Full Research Paper
  • Published 24 Mar 2011

  • PDF

  • Supp. Info

  • Video

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2011, 2, 173–185, doi:10.3762/bjnano.2.21

Infrared receptors in pyrophilous (“fire loving”) insects as model for new un-cooled infrared sensors

  1. David Klocke,
  2. Anke Schmitz,
  3. Helmut Soltner,
  4. Herbert Bousack and
  5. Helmut Schmitz
  • Full Research Paper
  • Published 30 Mar 2011

  • PDF

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2011, 2, 186–197, doi:10.3762/bjnano.2.22

Moisture harvesting and water transport through specialized micro-structures on the integument of lizards

  1. Philipp Comanns,
  2. Christian Effertz,
  3. Florian Hischen,
  4. Konrad Staudt,
  5. Wolfgang Böhme and
  6. Werner Baumgartner
  • Full Research Paper
  • Published 13 Apr 2011

  • PDF

  • Supp. Info

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2011, 2, 204–214, doi:10.3762/bjnano.2.24

Sorting of droplets by migration on structured surfaces

  1. Wilfried Konrad and
  2. Anita Roth-Nebelsick
  • Full Research Paper
  • Published 20 Apr 2011

  • PDF

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2011, 2, 215–221, doi:10.3762/bjnano.2.25

  • Full Research Paper
  • Published 27 Apr 2011

  • PDF

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2011, 2, 222–227, doi:10.3762/bjnano.2.26

  • Full Research Paper
  • Published 04 May 2011

  • PDF

  • Supp. Info

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2011, 2, 228–236, doi:10.3762/bjnano.2.27

  • Full Research Paper
  • Published 25 May 2011

  • PDF

  • Supp. Info

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2011, 2, 261–267, doi:10.3762/bjnano.2.30

  • Full Research Paper
  • Published 06 Jun 2011

  • PDF

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2011, 2, 276–283, doi:10.3762/bjnano.2.32

  • Full Research Paper
  • Published 16 Jun 2011

  • PDF

Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2011, 2, 302–310, doi:10.3762/bjnano.2.35

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