Prof. Thomas Schimmel

Editor-in-Chief

Institute of Applied Physics
Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
Karlsruhe
Germany

Scientific career

Since 2002 Coordinating Director of the Research Network of Excellence on Functional Nanostructures Baden-Württemberg, Germany
Since 2000 Director of the Center for Applied Nanotechnology, Universität Karlsruhe, Germany
Since 1998 Head of the research group “Nanostructuring and Scanning Probe Microscopy” at the Institute of Nanotechnology, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany
Since 1996 University Professor and Joint Institute Director at the Institute of Applied Physics, Universität Karlsruhe
1995 Habilitation at the Universität Bayreuth, Germany
1991 - 1995 Head of the Scanning Probe Group, Institute of Surface Science (Exp. Physik V) at the Universität Bayreuth
1990 Postdoctoral Fellowship at BASF AG, Ludwigshafen, Germany: Research on nanostructuring of semiconductors by STM lithography
1989 Dr. rer. nat. at the Universität Bayreuth; Ph. D. Thesis on charge transport in organic metals and conducting polymers
1979 - 1985 Study of Physics, Universität Bayreuth

 

Research areas

• Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

• Advanced Scanning Probe Microscopy incl. Chemical Contrast Imaging by AFM

• Nanostructured Materials and Coatings

• Nanoscale Lithography and Chemical Patterning

• Selforganization and Pattern Formation on the Nanometer Scale

• Atomic-scale electronic quantum devices; Single Atom Transistor

 

Thematic Series

Prof. Schimmel edited the Thematic Series in the Beilstein Journal of Nanotechnology:

Advanced atomic force microscopy techniques II (with Dr. Thilo Glatzel)

Advances in nanomaterials (with Prof. Herbert Gleiter)

Physics, chemistry and biology of functional nanostructures (with Prof. Paul Ziemann)

 

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